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  • So Far, Vaccines Remain Effective Against Variants
    by Lori Robertson on May 13, 2021 at 1:31 pm

    So far, COVID-19 vaccines have been effective against variants of the coronavirus. Scientists are monitoring the situation carefully, with updated or new vaccines a possibility in the future, if need be. The post So Far, Vaccines Remain Effective Against Variants appeared first on FactCheck.org.

  • Post Misleads on Japan’s Policy for Donating Blood After COVID-19 Vaccination
    by Joseph A. Gambardello on May 12, 2021 at 8:53 pm

    Japan only recently adopted guidelines for accepting blood donations from those who have received COVID-19 vaccines. The guidelines are intended to give donors time to get over any side effects from the vaccine. Without providing that context, a social media post misleadingly claims Japan is "refusing" blood donations from vaccinated people. The post Post Misleads on Japan’s Policy for Donating Blood After COVID-19 Vaccination appeared first on FactCheck.org.

  • Myth of Ballot Watermarks Flushed Out Again  
    by Brea Jones on May 12, 2021 at 3:31 pm

    An audit of ballots and a forensic audit of voting equipment earlier this year found no problems in the 2020 elections in Maricopa County, Arizona. But debunked claims about voter fraud revealed by secret "watermarks” are flowing again on social media amid a Republican-led audit. County officials say no watermarks were used on the ballots. The post Myth of Ballot Watermarks Flushed Out Again   appeared first on FactCheck.org.

  • Both Sides Spinning Jobs Report
    by D'Angelo Gore on May 11, 2021 at 10:58 pm

    The recently released jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics provided an opportunity for Democrats and Republicans alike to spin the facts in their favor. The post Both Sides Spinning Jobs Report appeared first on FactCheck.org.

  • No Scientific Basis for Vaccine ‘Shedding’ Claims
    by Catalina Jaramillo on May 11, 2021 at 9:55 pm

    COVID-19 vaccines do not contain a live virus, so there isn’t a biological path for a vaccinated person to “shed” the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein to those around them. Nor is there any evidence the vaccines cause reproductive problems. That means there's no basis for social media claims that “shedding” causes reproductive issues in unvaccinated people.  The post No Scientific Basis for Vaccine ‘Shedding’ Claims appeared first on FactCheck.org.